NATIONAL POETRY MONTH DAY 22: “THE GREAT LOVES OF OUR LIVES”

therumpus:

Begin with the body
desire manifests itself in the body:
the flutter of the heart
the nervous shake of a hand
the dilation of the pupils
hardening of nipples
thickening of mucus
within the vaginal walls.

New lovers celebrate the body
reveling in hungry
explorations of the vast
expanse…

Raw is real. 

Add this to the long, long list of shows I’ve sadly missed. 

Add this to the long, long list of shows I’ve sadly missed. 

Summer project. 

Summer project. 

It’s good to have goals. 

It’s good to have goals. 

nevver:

10 Commandments of Typography

Some rules are there for a reason. 

thatlitsite:

Quotes of the Month to date:

March 2014: Lena Dunham (author of Not That Kind of Girl)

February 2014: Jayme K. (author of The Extractor)

January 2014: Isaac Asimov (author of I, Robot)

December 2013: Anis Mojgani (author of The Feather Room)

November 2013: Hunter S. Thompson (author of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas)

Every month the notes will be tallied and a graphic will be created to commemorate the most popular author and quote of that given month.

thatkindofwoman:

that indigo lifestyle.

thatkindofwoman:

that indigo lifestyle.

nevver:

Where nobody lives

There’s something deeply refreshing about this, really.

nevver:

Where nobody lives

There’s something deeply refreshing about this, really.

theparisreview:

Andy Friedman, from “At the Fish Market.” The portfolio details the final morning of New York’s Fulton Fish Market, before moving indoors, under a roof in Hunts Point in the Bronx.

theparisreview:

Andy Friedman, from “At the Fish Market.” The portfolio details the final morning of New York’s Fulton Fish Market, before moving indoors, under a roof in Hunts Point in the Bronx.

likeafieldmouse:

Sol Lewitt - Incomplete Open Cubes (sculptures & studies, 1974)

kateoplis:

My so-called life on the set

wornwear:

InfamousOtis Rubottom, Portland, Oregon
Dear Patagonia, 
In 1994 I spend six months studying and traveling in Kenya and Tanzania. I was fortunate enough to stay with a few families, including a Samburu family in the highlands. I sailed and sweated on the coast, recovered in Nairobi, learned about animals, history and myself in the preserves and tried, unsuccessfully, to climb Mt. Kenya. My arrival in Samburuland corresponded fortuitously with the first rains in months, causing much celebration. While the Samburu clearly knew I didn’t bring the rain, we were seen as good omens, and greeted even more warmly than normal. In the language of the Masai and Samburu, the word for “God” and “rain” are the same, which more than anything I witnessed showed me the significance of water to their way of life.
I don’t think I ever met an unhappy tribesperson the entire time I was there. And the children I played with, kicked the soccer ball with, gave Band-Aids to and laughed with remain etched in my memory. Through it all, I wore this purple Spoonbill Hat, which is sadly no longer kicking—though it lasted well beyond the trip, after so many washings with super-powered African detergent (Blue Omo! Now with PowerFoam!) it could no longer perform. I have owned other Patagonia pieces longer, but this one had a rich life, and every time I see it in pictures, I’m reminded of the adventures it accompanied me on, especially the months in Africa. It was sort of joke among my travelling companions, who seemed to think its color was questionable. I don’t know why—I always loved it.
 (Also visible: Original Chouinard Equipment day pack; Patagonia A/C polo; Baggies longs)
-Otis


My little piece is up on @wornwear (complete w/ the glaring typo I missed). 

wornwear:

Infamous
Otis Rubottom, Portland, Oregon


Dear Patagonia,

In 1994 I spend six months studying and traveling in Kenya and Tanzania. I was fortunate enough to stay with a few families, including a Samburu family in the highlands. I sailed and sweated on the coast, recovered in Nairobi, learned about animals, history and myself in the preserves and tried, unsuccessfully, to climb Mt. Kenya. My arrival in Samburuland corresponded fortuitously with the first rains in months, causing much celebration. While the Samburu clearly knew I didn’t bring the rain, we were seen as good omens, and greeted even more warmly than normal. In the language of the Masai and Samburu, the word for “God” and “rain” are the same, which more than anything I witnessed showed me the significance of water to their way of life.

I don’t think I ever met an unhappy tribesperson the entire time I was there. And the children I played with, kicked the soccer ball with, gave Band-Aids to and laughed with remain etched in my memory. Through it all, I wore this purple Spoonbill Hat, which is sadly no longer kicking—though it lasted well beyond the trip, after so many washings with super-powered African detergent (Blue Omo! Now with PowerFoam!) it could no longer perform. I have owned other Patagonia pieces longer, but this one had a rich life, and every time I see it in pictures, I’m reminded of the adventures it accompanied me on, especially the months in Africa. It was sort of joke among my travelling companions, who seemed to think its color was questionable. I don’t know why—I always loved it.

 (Also visible: Original Chouinard Equipment day pack; Patagonia A/C polo; Baggies longs)

-Otis

My little piece is up on @wornwear (complete w/ the glaring typo I missed). 

kateoplis:

Sir Richard Branson opens Mahali Mzuri in Kenya

Not quite the way we experienced Kenya, but I’m down. 

Can proudly say I owned a set of these. 

Can proudly say I owned a set of these. 

"See the gap in the land on the horizon Thatcher? That’s Thatcher Pass. It’s where your name comes from." (at The Great Wide Open)

"See the gap in the land on the horizon Thatcher? That’s Thatcher Pass. It’s where your name comes from." (at The Great Wide Open)